AKTIONER
dezeen:

Travelling abattoir designed to expose the reality of meat production »

theenergyissue:

Cloud Seeding: Man-Made Rain

Cloud seeding, a form of weather modification, is the act of attempting to artificially induce or increase precipitation, usually to stave off drought. By dispersing substances into the air that serve as cloud condensation or ice nuclei, cloud seeding is meant to change the amount or type of precipitation that falls from clouds. The most common chemicals used for cloud seeding include silver iodide, potassium iodide and dry ice (solid carbon dioxide). Though the practice started as a fringe science in the 1940s, it entered the mainstream with Operation Popeye, a US military operation to increase rains over Vietnam during the Vietnam War in order to slow Vietnamese military truck activity in the region. While practiced widely around the worldnotably at the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympicsthe effectiveness of cloud seeding is still a matter of academic debate. Rainmaking in general has ancient roots and strong cultural significance in many societies around the world, and rain dances and other rituals are still practiced today in areas ranging from Zimbabwe to Slovakia. 


Ben Aronson, Coffee Break, 1997

Ben Aronson, Coffee Break, 1997

fabriciomora:

Proyecto Integral de Puesta en Valor del Camino Inca -  Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú

stockphotomodel:

talking to white people about reverse racism

image

theenergyissue:

"Media Burn" by Ant Farm

Ant Farm was an innovative collective working in media, architecture and spectacle established within the counter-cultural milieu of 1968 San Francisco. Created by two architects, Chip Lord and Doug Michels, and later joined by Curtis Schreier, their work dealt with the intersection of architecture, design and media art, critiquing the North American culture of mass media and consumerism. Ant Farm produced works in a number of formats, including agitprop events, manifestos, videos, performances and installations. In Media Burn, integrating performance, spectacle and media critique, Ant Farm staged an explosive collusion of two of America’s most potent cultural symbols: the automobile and television. On July 4, 1975, at San Francisco’s Cow Palace, Ant Farm presented what they termed the “ultimate media event.” In this alternative Bicentennial celebration, a “Phantom Dream Car”—a reconstructed 1959 El Dorado Cadillac convertible—was driven through a wall of burning TV sets

routine-routine:

PETER DE POTTER ROUTINE POST 104 28-02 S.O.M.

routine-routine:

PETER DE POTTER ROUTINE POST 104 28-02 S.O.M.

euo:

Toshio Saeki

euo:

Toshio Saeki